Posted by on February 16, 2018

Life was going along just fine…a bit boring, but that’s good actually sometimes isn’t it? I was headed to the doctor because they “saw something” on my mammogram.  An ultrasound would clear things up and I would be on my way back to my boring life. The technologist came in and started the scan. She didn’t know it, but I was a cardiac sonographer at the time so I knew exactly what I was looking at.  Only there wasn’t really anything to look at.  My two and a half inch tumor was blocking all the sound waves and the screen was white.

That’s when I felt it: the brick in the head

I call the stage 3 breast cancer that I was diagnosed with, my “brick in the head”.  It was my wake up call for lots of things, but mostly it was my wake up call to take charge.  Take charge of my health, my thoughts, my growth, and my possibly-too-short life.

During this time, as you would imagine, I started questioning things.  I asked why the doctor hadn’t offered me curcumin and shiitake mushroom extract like they are offered in Japan for breast cancer to increase the effectiveness of the chemo.  I asked why I wasn’t given a diet other than “anything you want.” I asked why I was advised against taking vitamins and juicing. Then I started asking more questions…namely to Spirit.  I asked “why me?” and “what does this all mean?” and “am I going to die soon?” When I wasn’t provided with proper answers, I began my own research and wow, was I surprised.  I started implementing my own plan of action during chemo to reduce side effects. I adopted a 100% plant-based diet, I started meditating, did yoga and hiked up Kennesaw Mountain…every morning…huffing and puffing. And I started changing my attitude to gratitude.

The most rewarding and powerful thing I did was help others who were going through the same thing and I found out that helping others not only feels good, but creates chemical changes in the body that boost your immune function and help fight disease. I also believed that through my actions I was exercising my compassion muscle, and the part of the brain that, among other things, helps us connect to one another and expresses compassion.

At the meeting, I’ll be sharing what I’ve learned since that day in 2005 when I was diagnosed and I will welcome hearing your thoughts as well. 

Please join us! Thank you!!

Susan Gonzalez 
MOON Organics

Comments

Be the first to comment.

Leave a Reply


You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

*